Flow Learning

The Flow Learning approach to working with children and adults was developed by Joseph Cornell. The basic principle implies that the children learn if they have enough energy, which then the teacher directs into the more focused learning of the upcoming lesson. At the same time, Cornell recommends the children having a direct experience with the subject matter and by sharing their experiences with others through stories, drawings, etc. they strengthen bonds between group members.

Thus, the children also raise the level or strength of their own energy.

AWAKEN ENTHUSIASM

Children’s enthusiasm is awakened by a short physical activity, which makes learning fun and challenging. In this way, we create a strong flow of energy the children will need to learn.


FOCUS ATTENTION

Once the children are engaged, they are full of energy, but their thoughts are scattered. Therefore, we focus their energy and attention on the subject they are studying. In this way, they become more concentrated and open to the idea of learning.


DIRECT EXPERIENCE

As you probably already know, it is easier for us to remember what we learn from hands-on experience or see with our own eyes than the textbook. Therefore, our teaching has to be as experienced as possible.


SHARING THE EXPERIENCE, KNOWLEDGE, EMOTIONS AND STORIES WITH CLASSMATES

The knowledge the children gained from the previous stage can be best achieved by telling what they have learned, to one another. This kind of revision shows how well the learning material is understood and it reveals any gaps in the children’s knowledge that can then be compensated by them or by their classmate. In the end, therefore, we give the children the opportunity to share their experience with a classmate or a small group.